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Patriarch Jacobus Maria DeJesus, D.D.


Catholic Action and The Virtue of Patriotism



Salutations, Congratulations, and Prayerful Wishes to the new U.S. President, Donald John Trump and the new U.S. Vice-President, Michael Richard Pence, from a Great-Great-Great Grandson of a Patriotic American Solider who fought for American Independence during the Revolutionary War.

We remember both of them and their families at the Holy Altar when Offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Catholic Traditional Mass.

God Bless them and their families.
Pray for Them.
God Bless America.











The Virtue of Patriotism

Sources Quoted

<<< Maryknoll Catholic Dictionary
<<< Garrigou-Lagrange
<<< Ireland
<<< Laravoire Morrow
<<< McHugh/Callan
<<< Mourret/Thompson
<<< Rumble
<<< Sheen
<<< Spalding
<<< Von Döllinger
<<< Washington


The Virtue of Patriotism





Sources Quoted

Definition of Patriotism

<<<  Maryknoll Catholic Dictionary

>> “The Maryknoll Catholic Dictionary”, 1965

“Patriotism.  Love of one’s country.  St. Paul (Titus 3:1) defined the Christian attitude toward the state: ‘Admonish them to be subject to princes and authorities, obeying commands, ready for every good work.’  Thus Catholic teaching has always required Patriotism.  It is a virtue akin to justice to pay one’s debts to one’s country, and charity demands that we love those neighbors who are our fellow countrymen.  Therefore, we are not only allowed to love our own country, but are expected to do so.  Patriotism must be distinguished from nationalism which is an excessive Patriotism.” (Albert J. Nevins, M.M., “The Maryknoll Catholic Dictionary”, 1965, p. 435, column 1-a).



<<<   Garrigou-Lagrange

>>  Reverend Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.
[b. Auch, France 1877 A.D. - d. Rome, Italy, 1964 A.D.]
The Trinity and God the Creator
Providence

“It is also wrong in the speculative order to say with Hegel that there is no good pure and simple and no evil pure and simple; that there is only qualified good, that is, something good according to the actual concepts of our time which tomorrow may be considered relatively evil. Thus Patriotism is not a simple good, but only a good with reference to the ideals of our time; in time to come, perhaps, when some internationalism may prevail, Patriotism would be regarded as obsolete. This is the language of absolute evolutionism condemned at the time of the Modernists. This proposition was condemned: ‘Truth is no more immutable than man himself; indeed truth is evolved with and through man’. [Endnote 1026: Father Heinrich Joseph Dominicus Denzinger [b. at Liège, Belgium on Sunday, October 10, 1819 A.D. - d. at Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany on Tuesday, June 19, 1883 A.D.], Enchiridion Symbolorum et Definitionum, no. 2058]. If this were true, there would be no absolute goodness, only a qualified goodness, or a relative goodness according to the changing ideas of a particular age. The first proposition condemned in Pius IX’s Syllabus was: ‘God actually becomes in man and in the world,. . . and God and the world are one and the same thing, as are also spirit and matter, necessity and liberty, truth and falsehood, good and evil, the just and the unjust’. [Endnote 1027:  Father Heinrich Joseph Dominicus Denzinger [b. at Liège, Belgium on Sunday, October 10, 1819 A.D. - d. at Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany on Tuesday, June 19, 1883 A.D.], Enchiridion Symbolorum et Definitionum, no. 1701].  It was against such pantheistic evolution that Isaias warned when he said, ‘Woe to you that call evil good and good evil’. [Endnote 1028: Isaias 5:20].” (Reverend Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.  [b. Auch, France 1877 A.D. - d. Rome, Italy, 1964 A.D.], who taught dogmatic and Spiritual theology for 53 years at the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, the Angelicum, in Rome, “The Trinity and God the Creator”.)

Note: Father Heinrich Joseph Dominicus Denzinger [b. at Liège, Belgium on Sunday, October 10, 1819 A.D. - d. at Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany on Tuesday, June 19, 1883 A.D.], Enchiridion Symbolorum et Definitionum, referenced above in the Endnotes of the above quoted Author:

# 2058: “58. Truth is no more immutable than man himself, inasmuch as it is evolved with him, in him, and through him.”  (Condemnation of this Heresy in the Decree of the Holy Office “Lamentabili”, Wednesday, July 3, 1907.)

# 1701: “1. No supreme, all wise, and all provident divine Godhead exists, distinct from this world of things, and God is the same as the nature of things and, therefore, liable to changes; and God comes into being in man and in the universe, and all things are God and they have the same substance of God; and God is one and the same as the world, and therefore, also, spirit is one and the same with matter, necessity with liberty, the true with the false, the good with the evil, and the just with the unjust (26).3  [Footnote # 3:  These numbers refer to the “Index”, of the Acts of Pius IX, from which the Syllabus has been excerpted.” [see above n. 1700].” (Condemnation of this Heresy in the “Syllabus”, Comprising the particular errors of our age, which are noted in consistorial Allocutions, in Encyclical and other Apostolic Letters of His Holiness, our Lord Pope Pius IX. Section I. Pantheism, Naturalism, and Absolute Rationalism.)

“The nearer a Soul is to God, the more it deserves our esteem; the closer the ties that bind it to us, the more sensible is our love for it, and the more whole-hearted should be the devotion we show in all that concerns family, country, vocation, and friendship. [Endnote 186:  Cf. Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P., (b. 1225 A.D. in Rocca Secca, Naples, Italy - d. Wednesday, March 7, 1274 A.D. in Fossa Nuova, Italy), Doctor of the Church: “Angelic Doctor”, “Common Doctor”; “Summa Theologica”, Part II-II, Question 26, Article 8.] Thus, instead of destroying Patriotism, Charity exalts it, as we see in the case of St. Joan of Are or St. Louis.  This, then, is the order to be observed in Charity. God desires to reign in our hearts, but He excludes no affection that can be subordinated to what is due to Himself. On the contrary, He exalts and quickens it, inspiring it with a greater dignity and generosity.” (Father Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P., “Providence”, Part V: Providence, Justice and Mercy, # 28. Providence And Charity Toward Our Neighbor, the Secondary Object of Charity.)

NoteSome details concerning the source given in Endnote 186: Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P., “Summa Theologica”, Part II-II, Question 26, Article 8:
 

“II-II Q[26] A[8]  [On the Contrary]”

“On the contrary, The commandments of the Decalogue contain a special precept about the honor due to our Parents (Exodus 20:12). Therefore we ought to love more specially those who are united to us by ties of blood.”

“II-II Q[26] A[8]  [Conclusion]”

“I answer that, As stated above (II-II Q[26] A[7]), we ought out of Charity to love those who are more closely united to us more, both because our love for them is more intense, and because there are more reasons for loving them. Now intensity of love arises from the union of lover and beloved: and therefore we should measure the love of different persons according to the different kinds of union, so that a man is more loved in matters touching that particular union in respect of which he is loved. And, again, in comparing love to love we should compare one union with another. Accordingly we must say that friendship among blood relations is based upon their connection by natural origin, the friendship of fellow-citizens on their civic fellowship, and the friendship of those who are fighting side by side on the comradeship of battle. Wherefore in matters pertaining to nature we should love our kindred most, in matters concerning relations between citizens, we should prefer our fellow-citizens, and on the battlefield our fellow-soldiers. Hence the Philosopher says (Ethic. ix, 2) that ‘it is our duty to render to each class of people such respect as is natural and appropriate. This is in fact the principle upon which we seem to act, for we invite our relations to a wedding... It would seem to be a special duty to afford our parents the means of living... and to honor them.’”

“II-II Q[26] A[8]  [Conclusion]”

“The same applies to other kinds of friendship.”

“II-II Q[26] A[8]  [Conclusion]”

“If however we compare union with union, it is evident that the union arising from natural origin is prior to, and more stable than, all others, because it is something affecting the very substance, whereas other unions supervene and may cease altogether. Therefore the friendship of kindred is more stable, while other friendships may be stronger in respect of that which is proper to each of them.” (Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P., (b. 1225 A.D. in Rocca Secca, Naples, Italy - d. Wednesday, March 7, 1274 A.D. in Fossa Nuova, Italy), Doctor of the Church: “Angelic Doctor”, “Common Doctor”; “Summa Theologica”, Part II-II, Question 26, Article 8:  On the Contrary; 3 Conclusions.)



<<<   Ireland

>>  Archbishop John Ireland, D.D.
Archbishop of St. Paul, Minnesota
[b. at Burnchurch, County Kilkenny, Ireland
on Tuesday, September 11, 1838 -
d. at St. Paul, Minnesota on Wednesday, September 25, 1918]

 “The Church and Modern Society, Lectures and Addresses”
 “The Catholic Church and Civil Society
The Mission of Catholics in America
Patriotism

“The Catholic Church commands and consecrates Patriotism. The true Catholic must needs be the true Patriot. In the eyes of the Church loyalty to country is loyalty to God; Patriotism is a Heavenly virtue, a high and Holy form of obedience; the Patriot dying for his country wears the halo of the Martyr.” (Archbishop John Ireland, Archbishop of St. Paul, “The Church and Modern Society, Lectures and Addresses”, New York, D. H. McBride & Co., 1903, “The Catholic Church and Civil Society”, pp.  39-40.)

“Patriotism is a Catholic virtue. I would have Catholics be the first Patriots in the land.” (Archbishop John Ireland, Archbishop of St. Paul, “The Church and Modern Society, Lectures and Addresses”, New York, D. H. McBride & Co., 1903, “The Mission of Catholics in America”, p.  91.)

“TO speak of Patriotism is my evening's task. An easy and gracious task it ought to be. Patriot ism is personified in my audience. The honor is mine to address the country's heroes, the country's martyrs. At country’s call you quickly buckled on your armor, and rushed where battle raged, to offer for your country's life the life-blood of your hearts. Many of you carry on breast and face the sacred stigmata of Patriotism. Your tried hands are doubly pledged in purest unselfishness and bravest resolve to uphold in the reign of peace the loved flag which in days of war they bore over gory fields above stain or reproach. I could not, if I would, close the portals of my soul to the rich and sweet inspirations which come to me from your souls.”

“I shall define Patriotism as you understand it and as you feel it. Patriotism is love of country and loyalty to its life and weal ; love tender and strong, tender as the affection of son for mother, strong as the pillars of death; loyalty generous and disinterested, shrinking from no sacrifice, seeking no reward save country’s triumph.”

“Next to God is country, and next to Religion is Patriotism.” (Archbishop John Ireland, Archbishop of St. Paul, “The Church and Modern Society, Lectures and Addresses”, New York, D. H. McBride & Co., 1903, “Patriotism”, pp. 161 and 163.)

Historical Note: Twenty Three years before Archbishop John Ireland [b. at Burnchurch, County Kilkenny, Ireland on Tuesday, September 11, 1838 -  d. at St. Paul, Minnesota on Wednesday, September 25, 1918] became the Bishop of St. Paul, Minnesota [1884 - 1888], and then Archbishop of St. Paul, Minnesota [1888 -  September 25, 1918], shortly after his Ordination to the Roman Catholic Priesthood in St. Paul, Minnesota, which was in 1861, Father John Ireland served as a Roman Catholic Chaplain during the Civil War for the Fifth Regiment of Minnesota Infantry until 1863 when ill health caused his resignation.

Archbishop John Ireland, Archbishop of St. Paul, “The Church and Modern Society, Lectures and Addresses”, is available in pdf file format at:
https://ia902205.us.archive.org/12/items/churchandmoderns027454mbp/churchandmoderns027454mbp.pdf



<<<   Laravoire Morrow

>> Bishop Louis Laravoire Morrow, S.T.D., D.D.
Bishop of Krishnagar, Nadia district
in the Indian state of West Bengal

“My Catholic Faith: A Manual Of Religion”, 1949
Part One-What to Believe
Chapter 43, Moral Virtues
Chapter 65, Services of the Church to the State

“Which are some of the other moral virtues? --Filial piety and Patriotism, which dispose us to honor, love, and respect our parents and our country.” (Bishop Louis Laravoire Morrow, S.T.D.,D.D., Bishop of Krishnagar, Nadia district in the Indian state of West Bengal, “My Catholic Faith: A Manual Of Religion”, 1949, Part One-What to Believe, Chapter 43, Moral Virtues.)

“The greatest statesmen and Patriots have recognized the necessity of religion in the State.  Without religion among its citizens, the State would soon collapse. The Catholic Church teaches the best religion, the one taught by God Himself.  For example, George Washington, the First President of the United States of America, said:

‘Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice ? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.’ [Washington’s Farewell Address, 1796].” (Most Reverend Louis Laravoire Morrow, S.T.D.,D.D., Bishop of Krishnagar, “My Catholic Faith: A Manual Of Religion”, 1949, Part One-What to Believe, Chapter 65, Services of the Church to the State).


<<<   McHugh/Callan

>> Father John Ambrose McHugh, O.P., S.T.M., Litt.D.
Father Charles Jerome Callan, O.P., S.T.M., Litt.D.,

“Moral Theology
A Complete Course Based on St. Thomas Aquinas
and the Best Modern Authorities”
Volume One,  # 1173
Volume Two, # 2346; # 2349

1173. The order of Charity as between those nearer to God and those nearer to self is as follows:....  (b) Subjectively, the love for those nearer to self is greater, that is, more intense, more vividly felt. The preferences for those nearer to self, therefore, far from being wrong or the expression of mere natural love, are expressions of Charity itself. For it is God’s will that more love should be shown to those who are nearer to us: ‘If any man have not care of his own, and especially of those of his house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel’ (I Tim., v. 8). Hence, Charity itself inclines one to have more love for one’s own, and it supernaturalizes filial piety, Patriotism, and friendship.” (Father John Ambrose McHugh, O.P., S.T.M., Litt.D., and Father Charles Jerome Callan, O.P., S.T.M., Litt.D., “Moral Theology, A Complete Course Based on St. Thomas Aquinas and the Best Modern Authorities”, Volume One,  # 1173, pp. 479-480; emphasis added.)

2346. Definition of Piety.--Piety in the strictest sense is defined as ‘a moral virtue that inclines one to pay to father and fatherland the duty of respect and assistance that is owed them as the authors and sustainers of our being’.... (b) Piety is shown to father and fatherland; that is, just as religion gives worship to God in acknowledgment of His excellence and our dependence upon Him, so does piety show due respect to those who hold the place of God in our respect on earth. Filial piety is owed to the Mother as well as to the Father, and in a less degree to other relatives, inasmuch as they share or continue the blood of one’s parents and may be regarded as representing them (e.g., Brothers and Sisters, Husband or Wife).   Patriotism belongs to one’s native land or the country, nation, state, city, etc., of which one is a citizen; and it should include, not only fellow-citizens, but also the friends and allies of one’s country. He who is the adopted citizen of a country should love the place of his birth, but loyalty and obedience are owed to the nation to which he has transferred his allegiance...”

“(d) Piety is owed to parents and country as the authors and sustainers of our being. Thus, it differs from legal justice, which is the duty owed the State or community, precisely as it is the whole of which one is a part. It differs likewise from commutative justice, which is obligatory in agreements with parents or other superiors, for the duty is then owed them as partners to a free contract. On account of this nobility of the formal object, filial piety and Patriotism are very like to religion and rank next after it in the catalogue of virtues.”

2349. Sins against Piety.–  (b) By Defect.--Disrespect for parents is felt when they are despised on account of their poverty, ignorance, or feebleness; it is shown by word (e.g., when they are addressed in bitter, reproachful, or contemptuous speech; or when they are ill spoken of to others), by signs (e.g., when mocking gestures or mimicry are used to ridicule them), by deeds (e.g., when they are threatened or struck), and by omissions (e.g., when their children are too proud to recognize them or to give them tokens of honor). Disrespect for one’s country is felt when one is imbued with anti-nationalistic doctrines (e.g., the principles of Internationalism [a.k.a. “blatant International integration”; International Authoritarianism (e.g. League of Nations; United Nations); Globalism; Authoritarian Ultrainternationalism; New One World Order; Universalistic Organized Terrorism; etc.] which hold that loyalty is due to a class, namely, the workers of the world or a capitalistic group, and that country should be sacrificed to selfish interests; the principle of Humanitarianism, which holds that Patriotism is incompatible with love of the race; the principle of Egoism which holds that the individual has no obligations to society); it is practised when one speaks contemptuously about country, disregards its good name or prestige, subordinates its rightful pre-eminence to a class, section, party, personal ambition, or greed, etc.” (Father John Ambrose McHugh, O.P., S.T.M., Litt.D., and Father Charles Jerome Callan, O.P., S.T.M., Litt.D., “Moral Theology, A Complete Course Based on St. Thomas Aquinas and the Best Modern Authorities”, Volume Two,  # 2346, pp. 411-412; # 2349, p. 414,; emphasis and examples added.)



<<<   Mourret/Thompson

>>  Rev. Fernand Mourret, S.S.
Translated by the Rev. Newton Thompson, S.T.D.

“A History of the Catholic Church”
Volume One, Period of Early Expansion,
Volume 1, Part 1, The Apostolic Period,
Chapter 2, The Early Church and the Jews

“For the people of Israel the Temple remained the sacred place where the Jewish nation offered its traditional sacrifices, aware of its great supernatural mission. They were proud of this noble edifice; its rebuilding, begun by Herod the Great, was not completed until the year 64, by Agrippa II. When a son of Israel, standing at the top of Mount Olivet, surveyed the gigantic wall which made the Temple look like an enormous fortress, the whole series of intercommunicating terraces, and at the summit the sanctuary itself, and its roof, covered with gold plates, reflecting the sun, his national pride was exalted; a grim irritation stirred in his soul against the foreign usurper; the memory of the heroic Machabees who, a century earlier, had won back the Temple and religious liberty in Palestine, enkindled in his breast both Patriotism and religion.” (Rev. Fernand Mourret, S.S., Translated by the Rev. Newton Thompson, S.T.D., “A History of the Catholic Church”, Volume One, Period of Early Expansion, B. Herder Book Co., 15 & 17 South Broadway, St. Louis, Mo., and 33 Queen Square, London, W. C., 1946, Volume 1, Part 1, The Apostolic Period, Chapter 2, The Early Church and the Jews, pp. 15-16; emphasis added.)

“A History of the Catholic Church” by Rev. Fernand Mourret, S.S., Translated by the Rev. Newton Thompson, S.T.D., is available for free in a pdf file format.  Download link for all 8 volumes in one PDF file:

https://ia800309.us.archive.org/7/items/AHistoryOfTheCatholicChurch/AHistoryOfTheCatholicChurchComplete.pdf

Web page for links for each of the 8 volumes in individual PDF files:
https://archive.org/details/AHistoryOfTheCatholicChurch   - click on PDF



<<<   Rumble

>>  Rev. Dr. Rumble, M.S.C.

Questions People Ask About the Catholic Church
Volume IV, Answer to Question # 1312
Volume V, Answer to Question # 650

“We must try to keep a calm and balanced judgment, difficult as it is in times of anxiety and stress. I admit, of course, thatsome newspapers do not even try to give truthful accounts. This is due to malice, deliberate suppression and deliberate invention being used to suit their own purposes. Such excesses can only be condemned, wherever they occur.” (Rev. Dr. Rumble, M.S.C.,Questions People Ask About the Catholic Church, Volume IV, Answer to Question # 1312. In time of war, newspapers put a halo of glory around war, and stir up hatred. They do this in the name of Patriotism.)

“Patriotism is a natural virtue and that it is a Christian virtue if inspired by Christian motives. This virtue imposes on a soldier engaged in a just war of self-defence an obligation not to deprive his country of his services by throwing away his weapons and allowing himself to be captured or killed. As early as 314 A.D. the Council of Aries, to show that Christianity cannot be made an excuse for evading military duties, decreed excommunication against those who would throw down their arms in time of war.”  (Rev. Dr. Rumble, M.S.C.,Questions People Ask About the Catholic Church, Volume V, Answer to Question # 650. What would be the position of a soldier who, confronted with an enemy, threw away his weapons through love of his neighbor and was shot by that enemy?)



<<<   Sheen

>>  Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, Ph.D., D.D.

“Three to Get Married”
Chapter 6, Love Is Triune
Chapter 19, For Better or For Worse

“Divine Life is an endless rhythm of three in oneness: Three Persons in one Nature. If God had no Son, He would not be a Father; if He were an individual Unity, He could not love until He had made something less than Himself. No one is good unless He gives. If He did not give to the highest way by generation, He would not be Good, and if He were not Good, He would be Terror. Before the world began, God was Good in Himself, because He eternally begot a Son. There is no act in God which is not God Himself. Thus, God is the eternal vortex of love, which is ever in blissful activity because He is Three, and yet One because proceeding from one Nature which is God. Here is the White Source of all love whence comes to us all its straggling rays. Here alone is the Source, the Stream, and the Sea of all love. All fatherhood, motherhood, sonship, espousals, friendship, wedded love, Patriotism, instinct, attraction, all interaction, and generation, is in some faint measure a picture of God.” (Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, Ph.D., D.D., “Three to Get Married”, Chapter 6, Love Is Triune.)

“The soldiers who desert their country’s cause in the heat of battle do not display Patriotism, but a diseased cowardice.”  (Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, Ph.D., D.D., “Three to Get Married”, Chapter 19, For Better or For Worse.)



<<<   Spalding

>>  Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, D.D.
Bishop of Peoria, Illinois
[b. at Lebanon, Kentucky on Tuesday, June 2, 1840 -
d. at Peoria, Illinois on Friday, August 25, 1916]

“Opportunity and Other Essays and Addresses”
Brief Quotes From:
Chapter VII, The Patriot, p. 193
Chapter VII, The Patriot, p. 200
Chapter VII, The Patriot, p. 211
Chapter VIII, Empire or Republic

“He alone is a Patriot who is willing to suffer obloquy [calumny; defamation] and the loss of money and friends, rather than betray the cause of truth, justice, and righteousness, for only by being faithful to this can he rightly serve his country.”  (Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, D.D., Bishop of Peoria, Illinois, “Opportunity and Other Essays and Addresses”, Third Edition, Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co. 1903, Chapter VII, “The Patriot”, p. 193; emphasis added.)

“A good Patriot is first of all a good man, true to himself and true in his relations to his fellowmen.”  (Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, D.D., Bishop of Peoria, Illinois, “Opportunity and Other Essays and Addresses”, Third Edition, Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co. 1903, Chapter VII, “The Patriot”, p. 200; emphasis added.)

“Patriotism, like Charity, begins at home.”  (Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, D.D., Bishop of Peoria, Illinois, “Opportunity and Other Essays and Addresses”, Third Edition, Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co. 1903, Chapter VII, “The Patriot”, p. 211; emphasis added.)

“By the treaty of 1783 the Mississippi river was recognized as the western boundary of the United States; but when in 1802 the Spanish civil officers, whom France, having recovered Louisiana, left in command, issued a proclamation closing the Mississippi to American commerce, it at once became manifest that we could not leave the mouth of the great river which flowed for more than a thousand miles through our territory, in the possession of a foreign power. Thomas Jefferson, therefore, acted in the spirit of a Patriot and a statesman, when, taking advantage of the embarrassments of Bonaparte, he purchased the whole region lying west of the Mississippi and not already occupied by Spain. Here was a natural development, the gaining possession of vast tracts of unsettled lands which, if not peopled by American citizens would become the home of a powerful rival state, and this would involve wars, standing armies and the jeopardy of free institutions. Similar reasons justified the purchase of Florida in 1819.”

“When, in 1845, we annexed the republic of Texas, we did what the Texans themselves wished us to do. Disputes concerning the western boundary of Texas led to the war with Mexico, which, at the close of the war sold to the United States New Mexico and Upper California, including Nevada and Utah, most of Arizona, and parts of Colorado. These countries were scarcely inhabited. Upper California containing not more than fifteen thousand people. In this whole course of expansion we followed the line of natural development. We entered upon the possession of waste regions which were geographically part of our country, and which we were certain to fill with populations similar to those occupying the states already founded. To carry out this work there could be no need of a standing army or a powerful navy; none of making war to conquer and hold in subjection races which, being altogether unlike ourselves, claimed the right, in the establishment of a government, to be guided by their own ideas and traditions. In purchasing these territories, it may be said that we bought land and not human beings— land that was part of our inheritance. ...  A war of conquest is in contradiction with our fundamental principles of government; it is opposed to all our traditions.” (Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, D.D., Bishop of Peoria, Illinois, “Opportunity and Other Essays and Addresses”, Third Edition, Chicago, A. C. McClurg & Co. 1903, Chapter VIII, “Empire or Republic”, pp. 216-218; emphasis added.)

Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, D.D., “Opportunity and Other Essays and Addresses”, free pdf file to download at:

https://ia601204.us.archive.org/30/items/OpportunityAndOtherEssays/OpportunityAndOtherEssays.pdf



<<<   Von Döllinger

>> Father Johann Josef Ignaz Von Döllinger, D.D.

“Studies in European History, Being Academical Addresses
Delivered by John Ignatius Von Döllinger, D.D.”
Chapter 2, The House of Wittelsbach and its Place in German History

“Addresses  on Historical and Literary Subjects,
In Continuation of Studies in European History”
 Chapter 8, The Part Taken by North America in Literature

“A public opinion which might serve as a warning, guide, or encouragement to monarchs, did not as yet exist in Germany, and Patriotism was accounted narrow-mindedness by the leading spirits of the day.”  (Father Johann Josef Ignaz Von Döllinger, D.D., “Studies in European History, Being Academical Addresses Delivered by John Ignatius Von Döllinger, D.D., Late Professor of Ecclesiastical History in the University of Munich,” Translated at the Request of the Author by Margaret Warre, With Portrait, Printed in London by John Murray, Albemarle Street, 1890; Chapter 2, The House of Wittelsbach and its Place in German History, p. 54; emphasis added.)

Father Johann Josef Ignaz Von Döllinger, D.D. “Studies in European History,  Being Academical Addresses Delivered by John Ignatius Von Döllinger, D.D.”, free pdf file to download at:

https://ia600207.us.archive.org/21/items/ra577208500dolluoft/ra577208500dolluoft.pdf
 

“This great career naturally brings to our minds a still greater name, held in the highest honour not only by the American nation, but by the whole civilised world George Washington. Great alike as a soldier and a statesman, he was singularly high-minded and free from selfish ambition, and was actuated solely by Patriotism and a sense of duty. He was highly favoured by fortune. The very existence of the new state was due pre-eminently to his creative genius.”  (Father Johann Josef Ignaz Von Döllinger, D.D., “Addresses  on Historical and Literary Subjects, In Continuation of Studies in European History”, Translated by Margaret Warre, Translator of “Studies in European History”, by the Same Author,  Printed in London by John Murray, Albemarle Street, 1894, Chapter 8, The Part Taken by North America in Literature, p. 272; emphasis added.)

Father Johann Josef Ignaz Von Döllinger, D.D., “Addresses  on Historical and Literary Subjects, In Continuation of Studies in European History”, free pdf file to download at:

https://ia902205.us.archive.org/28/items/addressesonhisto00dluoft/addressesonhisto00dluoft.pdf



<<<   Washington

>>  Washington’s Farewell Address
 Saturday, September 17, 1796

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice ? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.” (George Washington, “Washington’s Farewell Address”, Saturday, September 17, 1796, p. 23; emphasis added).

George Washington, “Washington's Farewell Address”, 1796, and “The Perpetuation of Our Political Institutions”, “An address delivered by Abraham Lincoln before the Young Men’s Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois, January 27, 1838”, free pdf file to download at:

https://ia800706.us.archive.org/2/items/washingtonsfare0wash/washingtonsfare0wash.pdf


The Roman Catholic Church teaches that, at the instant of human conception,
Almighty God infuses a Rational Immortal Soul into that human body.
It is the presence of the Rational Immortal Soul which indicates that a Person is alive.
Death is the absence of the Soul because the Soul has left the body.

This teaching also means that it is both immoral and sinful to vote
For any political candidate, for any office, for any reason, who is pro-abortion.
Any Catholic who would knowingly vote for any pro-abortion
political candidate [example:  Tim Kaine], commits a Mortal Sin and...
Also immediately becomes an automatically excommunicated Apostate!

The Blessing
V. Sit + Nomen Domini benedictum.
R. Ex hoc nunc, et usque in saeculum.
V. Adjutorium nostrum in
Nomine Domini.
R. Qui fecit cœlum et terram.
V. Benedicat vos, Omnipotens Deus:
V. Pa + ter, et Fi + lius, et Spiritus + Sanctus, descendat super vos, et maneat semper.
R. Amen.
V. Blessed + be the Name of the Lord.
R. Now and for ever more.x
V. Our help is in the Name of the Lord.
mm
R. Who made Heaven and earth.
V. May Almighty God Bless thee:x
V. The Fa + ther, the + Son, and the Holy + Ghost, descend upon thee, and always remain with thee.
R. Amen.


Knowledge
 
It is of the greatest importance that in order to gain assured knowledge of things, to rely on exact acquaintance with facts, rather than on the uncertain testimony of public rumor; and then what we have proved for certain we may proclaim without hesitation. (Saint Bernard of Clairvaux  [b. Castle Fontaines, near Dijon, France in 1090 A.D. - d. at Clairvaux, France on Friday, August 21, 1153 A.D.], Abbot of Clairvaux, Doctor of the Church, Letters).

Please Help a Suffering Soul in Purgatory NOW!
Our Blessed Mother asks Catholics to Pray her Traditional Rosary daily.
The Rosary will really make a Powerful difference in Your Life!
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